Friday, December 31, 2010

2 hives lost

It was warm enough again for the hives to have bees out and about cleansing. I noticed 2 hives for the second time durring a warm spell, not active. I broke them open and this is what I found:



Both hives with Kona Queens from Hawaii didn't make it. There were inches from food, but starved to death. There were also random pupae ready to hatch that they abandonded to try to stay warm. I will place some of their old honey stores on a hive that is desperatly needing honey.

2 out of 12 isnt so bad... but we have a few months left to go!

7 comments:

  1. So its okay to put frames from a hive that did not make it, not due to disease, on a hive that might be able to use it?

    What if its uncapped? I had two hives and my one did not make it--I think it swarmed in early September.

    ReplyDelete
  2. OMG! This is what I am so afraid of. Just seeing the bees like that, with their little butts in the air, breaks my heart :( I'm sorry about the hives you lost Jared.

    Could I possibly share that first picture on my blog with a link to your blog?

    When a hive is opened in the winter months should you suit up and smoke them like usual. I went to my hive yesterday because it was warming and the girls were vicious.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Theqpb: The problem with uncapped cells is that the bees might not have converted it to honey yet and it could cause a little dysentary. But it beats starving to death. If your one hive needs it, put the frames on there. Just don't be messing around too much getting them cold. In and out FAST.

    Michelle: I do not suit up because all I do is pop the top and peek real fast. I would be viscious too if someone ripped off the roof and blew cold air all over my nice warm body. You just want to identify where they are in the cluster location. That is where the brood nest will be. Don't be in there more than 60 seconds. You may share anything you want from my blog.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Sorry to hear it bud. I don't think those Hawaiian queens can adapt to the climate here. The summers are hot, but the winters can be fickle, so I don't think they can do well here. All three of my colonies are doing okay. I'm feeding them candy to get over the hump and getting ready to order goodies from Dadant and Brushy Mountain. Went to Dadant the other day and they're expecting the biggest bee orders than ever. Good luck with the rest. -M

    ReplyDelete
  5. It is always difficult to keep the hives going. I hope you are able to keep the other ten buzzing along. We all need the honey bee, and home-grown may be the best way of preserving some of the great bee's that are still left.

    Thankfully it doesn't look like CCD.

    ReplyDelete